Dawson – Practicum: Week 4 (Finale)

This wasn’t just my last week of practicum, but it was my last week of classes at SAIT. I was asked to make a news pack for my supervisor that also made it into the final show–and I had to put it all together in an hour because it wasn’t really up to snuff the first time around. I was actually proud of the result for the first time since the start of the quarantine.

We had our last Newsfile class watch, and it ended somewhat somber. I still had to finish my demo website so I couldn’t stick around for a lot of it either.

There were a lot of tears from what I was still there to see. James ended the last show in such an eloquent nice way too–which somewhat added to the sting. It was difficult not being able to really engage with the class as we watched and talked.

But it’s not all about feeling bad. I think everyone shared the same feeling of accomplishment coming out of a semester that had some added challenge tacked on–especially the instructors who deserve some props for getting things together for the students on such short notice. It wasn’t easy to get everything done, and with the helpline not being helpful or online frequently (I know they have a lot of people to help) it was made pretty difficult to get things together at times. I was extremely anxious going into my last few assignments until someone at the Adobe help desk was able to set me up with a loophole for getting creative cloud back.

It’s rough looking back on pre-quarantine because in many ways it felt like I wasn’t grateful for how much more facility we had over what we could do, how and when. I remember just before the quarantine started some of us spoke about how it felt like something disastrous was coming up–like how the air gets thicker before a storm. It hasn’t been a disaster, but it’s been hard. Knowing that we may not get a chance to be a relatively full class together again will be hard too. Now it’s over, and it’s been a few days of listless, zero-activity days. I go on walks when I can, and get fresh air, talk to people online or over the phone, but something about it is so much more confining–even though it’s all what I’d likely be doing right now anyway.

This is my last “assignment” for the class, and I was putting it off a bit because I don’t know if I’m alright with it all being truly “over”, you know? But it is.

It’s been fun, but nothing fun is permanent. Thanks RTBN, I’d do it all again in a heartbeat (that is not a request to fail me please don’t do that).

High school milestones cancelled due to covid-19

“It was something that like you look forward to like, I don’t know, probably since junior high school.”

As the covid-19 pandemic prevents school classes, and move online, exams aren’t the only events being cancelled. High school seniors around the country are missing out on all the milestones that come with graduating high school. The class of 2020 graduates will not get to walk the stage, attend their graduation banquet in fancy gowns and tuxes, or even say goodbye to the people they spent 3 years with.

“I’m hoping that we’ll do something for those grade twelves once the isolation orders are lifted, but at this point in time, that’s a pretty significant milestone that these students aren’t getting to mark.”

Teens spend everyday for 3 or more years with the same class mates and teachers, working everyday with the purpose of graduating high school and going out into the real world. This hard work is supposed to be recognized and celebrated with the traditional cap and gown ceremony, and formal banquet.

Parents spend hundreds of dollars on dresses and suits. Many girls pick out their dresses months in advance, most grade 12’s have already purchased their attire and now have no dance to attend.

Luna Sinclair, a grade 12 student in Calgary said that the she and all of her friends had been waiting for graduation for years and stated how disappointed all of her class is, “It was something that like you look forward to like, I don’t know, probably since junior high school”.

“I won’t be able to see them except like during the summer of next year. So it’s off that way.” Luna said when talking about seeing her friends next year.

Grade 12 teachers understand the cancellation of events, but many believe that diploma exams are the least important milestone for graduating students.

Nicole Cameron, a high school humanities teacher in Calgary explained that in an emergency situation like the coronavirus pandemic, diploma exams hold no importance, but missing milestones like graduation will impact students for the rest of their lives. She hopes that after isolation orders are lifted, the school will be able to hold some sort of celebration of the 2020 class, but worries with so many kids leaving to post secondary, it won’t be possible.

The class of 2020 graduates will undoubtedly be prepared for a changing world of technology, after facing the complications of online learning, like no one else. But with the character and resilience these teens are learning, they are also missing out on such a universal experience. This class will not relate to so many other Canadians on what it feels like to walk the stage and shake hands with the principle, after years of homework and cramming for exams.

Sydney Chisholm

Saskatchewan highschool seniors are wondering what’s next for there education.

As COVID-19 continues to impact peoples lives around the globe, highschool students are patiently waiting too hear about their futures.

“Really nice to be Graduated…”

Tisdale Middle and Secondary School, like others received the news that they would have to close its doors and practice social distancing. The Province of Saskatchewan announced that any grade 12 students who had the marks to graduate were considered graduates. Trey Ratcliffe, a highschool senior at T.M.S.S. was one of the many students who is still waiting to hear on what’s happening next. ” When they said all kids who had good enough marks to graduate we’re graduated it was kind of like that’s really nice to be graduated, but at the same time it’s like so does that mean if this blows over are we going right back to school or does it mean we’re like done.”

“Grads will be honoured…”

Like the students, the staff at T.M.S.S is also facing new challenges on how the rest of this school year will plan out. Dave Painchaud, the Vice Principal at the school is looking at new ways to deliver content to the students. Some suggestions from the school division include Moodle, or even delivery content through the mail to students with little internet access. He is also unsure about what is happening with the graduating class. “So our division has given families the message that grads will be honoured this year.” Painchaud says they haven’t exactly worked out all the details yet, but there could be ceremonies in June or even in September.

Although there are a lot of unknowns, the school divison is working tiresly to ensure the students still get their education.

-Brody Ratcliffe